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  • The nuclear epidermal growth factor receptor signaling network and its role in cancer.

The nuclear epidermal growth factor receptor signaling network and its role in cancer.

Discovery medicine (2011-12-01)
Toni M Brand, Mari Iida, Chunrong Li, Deric L Wheeler
ABSTRACT

The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a member of the EGFR family of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). EGFR activation via ligand binding results in signaling through various pathways ultimately resulting in cellular proliferation, survival, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis. Aberrant expression or activity of EGFR has been strongly linked to the etiology of several human epithelial cancers including but not limited to head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), colorectal cancer (CRC), breast cancer, pancreatic cancer, and brain cancer. Thus intense efforts have been made to inhibit the activity of EGFR by designing antibodies against the ligand binding domains (cetuximab and panitumumab) or small molecules against the tyrosine kinase domain (erlotinib, gefitinib, and lapatinib). Although targeting membrane-bound EGFR has shown benefit, a new and emerging role for EGFR is now being elucidated. In this review we will summarize the current knowledge of the nuclear EGFR signaling network, including how it is trafficked to the nucleus, the functions it serves in the nucleus, and how these functions impact cancer progression, survival, and response to chemotherapeutics.