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  • Reductive dechlorination of high concentrations of tetrachloroethene to ethene by an anaerobic enrichment culture in the absence of methanogenesis.

Reductive dechlorination of high concentrations of tetrachloroethene to ethene by an anaerobic enrichment culture in the absence of methanogenesis.

Applied and environmental microbiology (1991-08-01)
T D DiStefano, J M Gossett, S H Zinder
ABSTRACT

Tetrachloroethene, also known as perchloroethylene (PCE), is a common groundwater contaminant throughout the United States. The incomplete reductive dechlorination of PCE--resulting in accumulations of trichloroethene, dichloroethene isomers, and/or vinyl chloride--has been observed by many investigators in a wide variety of methanogenic environments. Previous mixed-culture studies have demonstrated that complete dechlorination to ethene is possible, although the final dechlorination step from vinyl chloride to ethene is rate limiting, with significant levels of vinyl chloride typically persisting. In this study, anaerobic methanol-PCE enrichment cultures which proved capable of dechlorinating high concentrations PCE to ethene were developed. Added concentrations of PCE as high as 550 microM (91-mg/liter nominal concentration; approximately 55-mg/liter actual aqueous concentration) were routinely dechlorinated to 80% ethene and 20% vinyl chloride within 2 days at 35 degrees C. The methanol level used was approximately twice that needed for complete dechlorination of PCE to ethene. The observed transformations occurred in the absence of methanogenesis, which was apparently inhibited by the high concentrations of PCE. When incubation was allowed to proceed for as long as 4 days, virtually complete conversion of PCE to ethene resulted, with less than 1% persisting as vinyl chloride. An electron balance demonstrated that methanol consumption was completely accounted for by dechlorination (31%) and acetate production (69%). The high volumetric rates of PCE dechlorination (up to 275 mumol/liter/day) and the relatively large fraction (ca. one-third) of the supplied electron donor used for dechlorination suggest that reductive dechlorination could be exploited for bioremediation of PCE-contaminated sites.

MATERIALS
Product Number
Brand
Product Description

Supelco
Carbosieve Adsorbent, matrix Carbosieve G, 60-80 mesh, bottle of 5 g
Supelco
Carbosieve Adsorbent, matrix Carbosieve G, 80-100 mesh, bottle of 5 g